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Statistics in Small Doses

Statistics in Small Doses #18 – What about systematic reviews and meta-analyses?

  In the last Statistics in small doses, it was concluded that the triangle of study designs can be misleading if viewed as a hierarchy. The ... Full story

Statistics in Small Doses 17 – Are Observational Studies Helpful to Medical Research?

“State IDs restaurant as source of disease” [Honolulu Star Bulletin, 16 August 2016]“State embargoes suspect scallops” [Honolulu Star Bulletin, 17 August 2016] The Hawaii State Department ... Full story

Statistics in Small Doses 16 – Oh My, Yet Another Editorial on the P-Value?

From time to time an interesting article appears or an interesting conversation takes place that deserves to be shared among fellow researchers. This Statistics in Small Doses describes an important coming-to-terms for scientists at the European Center for Nuclear Research (Geneva). ... Full story

Statistics in small doses 15 Part B – More statistical hot spots: How important is common sense to statistical sense?

Inconsistent time points at which measurements are taken Correlation between measures taken at different time points become less meaningful A measure of limb functionality may be obtained ... Full story

Statistics in Small Doses (#15 Part A) - What are some Statistical “Hot Spots?”

Many commercial software programs can handle all but the most esoteric statistical tests with simple clicks on a computer keyboard. There are even YouTube videos that show which buttons to click and when. Unfortunately, there is little emphasis on the reasoning that must be applied when choosing among the array of procedures that might be appropriate to address a study’s specific research objectives, and there is almost no mention of the importance of quality data collection and management. This month’s Statistics in small doses draws on actual examples from a recent review of study protocols and papers, and serves as a recap of previous “doses.” ... Full story

Statistics in Small Doses #14 – What are Confidence Intervals (continued)?

In research, the value reflecting ‘no effect’ is usually 0 or 1.0. So, like traditional significance testing, if 0 or 1.0 is inside the confidence ... Full story

Statistics in Small Doses #13 – What are Confidence Intervals?

“In medical studies investigators are usually interested in determining the size of difference of a measured outcome between groups, rather than a simple indication of ... Full story

Statistics in Small Doses – What are P-Values?

P-values are often sought as some kind of Holy Grail in science. Arguably one of the most controversial topics in statistics, we start our 2016 ... Full story

Statistics in Small Doses: Does Shape Matter?

Like humans, frequency distributions come in different shapes. Immediately after surgery, the majority of patients in the PACU may report ‘no to low’ pain on ... Full story

Statistics in Small Doses: What factors affect sample size?

This installment of ‘statistics in small doses’ goes hand-in-glove with the previous – Does (sample) size matter? We need not wade through sample size formulae ... Full story